CTD²: Cancer Target Discovery and Development

The Cancer Target Discovery and Development (CTD2) Network, a functional genomics initiative, bridges the gap between cancer genomics and biology. The Network aims to understand how tumor heterogeneity leads to drug resistance in order to develop optimal combinations of chemotherapy or small molecules in combination with immunotherapy. 

Banner for CTD squared program. Links to CTD squared program page
Last updated: January 03, 2019

News & Publications

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OncoPPi
CTD²
October 04, 2019

Protein-protein interactions (PPIs) control all functions and physiological states of the cell. Identification and understanding of novel PPIs would facilitate the discovery of new biological models and therapeutic targets for clinical intervention. Numerous resources and PPI databases have been...

Schematic of study design and serum specimen collection.
CTD²
September 25, 2019

Despite remarkable success of immune checkpoint inhibitors, the majority of cancer patients have yet to receive durable benefits. Here, in order to investigate the metabolic alterations in response to immune checkpoint blockade, we comprehensively profile serum metabolites in advanced melanoma...

Graphical abstract from Li, et al (2019).
CTD²
September 19, 2019

The proteinaceous extracellular matrix (ECM) is vital for the survival, proliferation, migration, and differentiation of many types of cancer. However, little is known regarding metabolic pathways required for ECM secretion. By using an unbiased computational approach, we searched for enzymes...

Ovarian Cancer Stage IIIC
CTD²
September 13, 2019

Introduction: Due to the relatively low mutation rate and high frequency of copy number variation, finding actionable genetic drivers of high-grade serous carcinoma (HGSC) is a challenging task. Furthermore, emerging studies show that genetic alterations are frequently poorly represented at the...

Graphical abstract from Huang, et al (2019).
CTD²
September 05, 2019

Human neural stem cell cultures provide progenitor cells that are potential cells of origin for brain cancers. However, the extent to which genetic predisposition to tumor formation can be faithfully captured in stem cell lines is uncertain. Here, we evaluated neuroepithelial stem (NES) cells,...

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