CTD²: Cancer Target Discovery and Development

The Cancer Target Discovery and Development (CTD2) Network, a functional genomics initiative, bridges the gap between cancer genomics and biology. The Network aims to understand how tumor heterogeneity leads to drug resistance in order to develop optimal combinations of chemotherapy or small molecules in combination with immunotherapy. 

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Last updated: November 14, 2018

News & Publications

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Cancer arises fro DNA mutations in cells
CTD²
November 02, 2018

Activation of platelet-derived growth factor receptor alpha (PDGFRA) by genomic aberrations contributes to tumor progression in several tumor types. In this study, we characterize 16 novel PDGFRA mutations identified from different tumor types and identify three previously uncharacterized...

Graphical abstract from Wang et al, 2018.
CTD²
October 30, 2018

Hippo signaling has been recognized as a key tumor suppressor pathway. Here, we perform a comprehensive molecular characterization of 19 Hippo core genes in 9,125 tumor samples across 33 cancer types using multidimensional "omic" data from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We identify somatic drivers...

Bone marrow aspirate showing acute myeloid leukemia. Several blasts have Auer rods.
CTD²
October 17, 2018

The implementation of targeted therapies for acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) has been challenging because of the complex mutational patterns within and across patients as well as a dearth of pharmacologic agents for most mutational events. Here we report initial findings from the Beat AML...

TP53 Mutation Landscape from the Genomic Data Commons
CTD²
October 01, 2018

Unlike most tumor suppressor genes, the most common genetic alterations in tumor protein p53 (TP53) are missense mutations1,2. Mutant p53 protein is often abundantly expressed in cancers and specific allelic variants exhibit dominant-negative or gain-of-function activities in...

Breast Cancer Stage IIIB
CTD²
October 01, 2018

The mammary epithelium is composed of an inner luminal and surrounding myoepithelial cell layer. The presence of cancer cells beyond the myoepithelium defines invasive breast cancer, yet the role of the myoepithelium during invasion remains unclear. We developed a 3D organotypic culture assay to...

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