CTD²: Cancer Target Discovery and Development

CTD2 bridges the gap between the enormous volumes of data generated by genomic characterization studies and the ability to use these data for the development of human cancer therapeutics. It specializes in computational and functional genomics approaches critical for translating next-generation sequencing data, as well as high-throughput and high content small molecule and genetic screens.

Cancer Target Discovery and Development
Last updated: January 12, 2018

News & Publications

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Schematic detailing CRES
CTD²
December 01, 2017

The CRISPR-Cas9 system has revolutionized gene editing both at single genes and in multiplexed loss-of-function screens, thus enabling precise genome-scale identification of genes essential for proliferation and survival of cancer cells. However, previous studies have reported that a gene-...

OncoPPi Portal: Therapeutic Connectivity map
CTD²
November 24, 2017

Motivation: As cancer genomics initiatives move toward comprehensive identification of genetic alterations in cancer, attention is now turning to understanding how interactions among these genes lead to the acquisition of tumor hallmarks. Emerging pharmacological and clinical...

Graphical Abstract by Gönen et al. (2017)
CTD²
November 22, 2017

We report the results of a DREAM challenge designed to predict relative genetic essentialities based on a novel dataset testing 98,000 shRNAs against 149 molecularly characterized cancer cell lines. We analyzed the results of over 3,000 submissions over a period of 4 months. We found that...

Small-molecule screen in drug-tolerant persister cells
CTD²
November 09, 2017

Acquired drug resistance prevents cancer therapies from achieving stable and complete responses. Emerging evidence implicates a key role for non-mutational drug resistance mechanisms underlying the survival of residual cancer 'persister' cells. The persister cell pool constitutes a reservoir...

Image of KRAS-Positive Lung Cancer
CTD²
November 06, 2017

A widespread approach to modern cancer therapy is to identify a single oncogenic driver gene and target its mutant-protein product (for example, EGFR-inhibitor treatment in EGFR-mutant lung cancers). However, genetically driven resistance to targeted therapy limits patient survival. Through...

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