TARGET: Therapeutically Applicable Research to Generate Effective Treatments

TARGET applies a comprehensive genomic approach to determine molecular changes that drive childhood cancers. Investigators form a collaborative network to facilitate discovery of molecular targets and translate those findings into the clinic. TARGET is managed by NCI’s Office of Cancer Genomics and Cancer Therapy Evaluation Program.

Therapeutically Applicable Research to Generate Effective Treatments

News & Publications

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Genes differentially expressed by pediatric and adult acute myeloid leukemia
January 09, 2018

TARGET investigator’s study of nearly 1,000 pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases reveals marked differences between the genomic landscapes of pediatric and adult AML and offers directions for future work.

December 12, 2017

We present the molecular landscape of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and characterize nearly 1,000 participants in Children’s Oncology Group (COG) AML trials. The COG–National Cancer Institute (NCI) TARGET AML initiative assessed cases by whole-genome, targeted DNA, mRNA and microRNA...

Kaplan-Meier analyses of miR-21 and miR-221 in the TARGET cases
November 14, 2017

Osteosarcoma is the most common malignant bone tumor in children and young adults. Despite the use of surgery and multi-agent chemotherapy, osteosarcoma patients who have a poor response to chemotherapy or develop relapses have a dismal outcome. Identification of biomarkers for active disease...

Clustering of miRNA expression profiles from primary AML
October 25, 2017

Children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) whose disease is refractory to standard induction chemotherapy therapy or who experience relapse after initial response have dismal outcomes. We sought to comprehensively profile pediatric AML microRNA (miRNA) samples to identify dysregulated genes and...

sequencing reveals mutations across genome
August 21, 2017

We performed genome-wide sequencing and analyzed mRNA and miRNA expression, DNA copy number, and DNA methylation in 117 Wilms tumors, followed by targeted sequencing of 651 Wilms tumors. In addition to genes previously implicated in Wilms tumors (WT1, CTNNB1, AMER1, DROSHA, DGCR8, XPO5, DICER1,...

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Projects

Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

The TARGET Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia projects elucidate comprehensive molecular characterization to determine the genetic changes that drive the initiation and progression of hard-to-treat childhood cancers. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) is a cancer of white blood cells, the cells in the body that normally fight infection.

Acute Myeloid Leukemia

The TARGET Acute Myeloid Leukemia projects elucidate comprehensive molecular characterization to determine the genetic changes that drive the initiation and progression of high-risk or hard-to-treat childhood cancers. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a cancer that originates in the bone marrow from immature white blood cells known as myeloblasts. About 25% of all children with leukemia have AML. 

Kidney Tumors

The TARGET Kidney Tumor projects elucidate comprehensive molecular characterization to determine the genetic changes that drive the initiation and progression of high-risk or hard-to-treat childhood cancers. Pediatric kidney tumors fall into four primary categories: Wilms tumors (~85% of all cases), clear cell sarcomas of the kidney (~5%), congenital mesoblastic nephromas (~4%), and rhabdoid tumors of the kidney (~3%). The TARGET initiative is investigating three of these tumor types.

Neuroblastoma

The TARGET Neuroblastoma projects elucidate comprehensive molecular characterization to determine the genetic changes that drive the initiation and progression of high-risk or hard-to-treat childhood cancers. Neuroblastoma (NBL) is a cancer that arises in immature nerve cells of the sympathetic nervous system, primarily affecting infants and children.

Osteosarcoma

The TARGET Osteosarcoma project elucidates comprehensive molecular characterization to determine the genetic changes that drive the initiation and progression of high-risk or hard-to-treat childhood cancers. Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most common type of bone cancer in children and adolescents.

Last updated: February 16, 2017